Old Diary

Rude Behavior Revisited

Got a lot done before noon today.  And then, seeing as we already caught up the hours we missed on Monday, I called it quits and headed home.

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Da Boss! Belva is checking out one of the L.E.O.’s OHV’s up at our compound

Which is not to say that the day was easy.  It started off at the construction on US 101 — where one of the flaggers flagged me down to inquire WHO was supposed to be taking care of the day use area adjacent to their project.  It seems that the toilets are in pretty bad shape.

It turns out this is one of the bathrooms that our returned Floridian is supposed to be taking care of and I stopped off at three of the day use areas that are his charge and every one of them was filthy.  There has been some ongoing drama with this volunteer ever since he returned on January — I wrote about it a couple weeks ago I think.  Anyway I have been taking the attitude that I had nothing to do with hiring him and I’m a firm believer in the fact that people will ultimately reveal their real person — given a little time.  That’s happening here now…  The gossip continues, the boss has taken the brunt of his disrespect and I expect something to happen out of it all.  Soon.

I’ve already said my piece.  If I had been the one to hire him I would have fired him already.  There is no excuse for disrespect, and these bullying tactics are just crude.  But… in that he went around me to get hired I’m not going to be the one to pull the plug.  That’s a political battle I’m better off letting Da Boss fight.  It hurts me that this fellow is causing so much grief for almost all the other volunteers and I’m sure it won’t last much longer — but no one needs that kind of trouble when they are volunteering.  There simply isn’t an excuse for disrespect.
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I mentioned the crane truck we have — Belva and Bob happened to be driving through and wanted to see our new home — so they stopped by. Having not show a picture of it I thought I’d include it now.

2014041617015910The OHV staff keeps machines up here at our work center.  Part of the  reason Belva stopped had to do with getting photos of two of them.  So, here are a couple examples of the machines these people are riding around on across the dunes.
2014041617014006Don’t ask me about them.  I have little interest in OHV’ing but they are fun I’m told.

Well, that does it for me today.  Thanks for stopping by and I’ll talk with you tomorrow!

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Old Diary

Vroom, Vroom

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Downhill!

Even a guy who likes quiet recreation has to go watch the OHV’s from time to time. Which is what we did with part of our weekend.

OHV’s are allowed at a variety of locations throughout  Dunes.  There are ongoing battles between the OHV’ers and Law Enforcement; feelings that they ought to be able to ride anywhere they want, and even Law Enforcement wanting to keep the riders where they belong.  That is a battle that will take on new dimensions this year when after 10 years the USFS and other agencies release what is being called the 10C route maps.  With increasing use by OHV’ers its getting more important to see that everyone who wants to use the forest is enabled to do so safely and pleasurably.

One of the areas they ‘belong’ is called the South Jetty Staging Area where there’s a wall of sand.  We caught this shots just watching OHV’er going up and down the sand.

There’s definitely a lot of testosterone flowing here.  But sometimes the turns of events are a bit humorous.2014032216453827   We saw this mini pickup blowin’ smoke every time he bagged the throttle.  I have no idea how much he’d juiced this little diesel but he was sure planning on impressing people with his power.

The problem being that he didn’t fully commit to running the hill, so he hit the throttle perhaps 2/3 of the way and stalled out about 1/3 of the way up the hill.  This had to be embarrassing for someone so obvious about his machismo — and after failing to make the grade he slunk off into a corner of the staging area and we heard no more from him the rest of the time we were there.

2014032216554986More interesting to me was this young lad on his OHV.  I’ve been curious to note how young some of these riders are.  Of course you get the little tykes — male and female that parents gear up in all the riding apparel so that they look really cute and I’ve seen some very small kids on some very small OHV’s.  This guy can’t be much more than 6, maybe 7 years.  The OHV is perfectly sized for him — I have no idea how many horsepower he’s playing with — but with his weight and the size of the quad he’s perfectly able to have a lot of fun.  And mom and dad weren’t letting him get very far from their supervision — he stayed within 1/2 a city block of them all the time and they really weren’t paying much attention to him — but he was, at least, obedient.

Before signing off I want to mention OHV accidents.

Friday I was talking to a retired Coos County Sheriff who was back on the job because both the Country Dunes Patrol Officers had been injured on the job.  These are people who are trained and knowledgeable about OHV safety and even THEY have accidents and crashes.  We may not think enough about the safety aspects of off highway riding.   Following are three different charts detailing deaths and emergency room injuries from the mid 1980’s and 2011.

Please ride carefully.  It’s scary to realize how many people lose their lives in the pursuit of what is supposed to be recreation!

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ATV-Related Deaths and Injuries for All Ages 1985-2011

(ATVs with 3, 4 or Unknown Number of Wheels)

Year

Reported Deaths¹

Estimated Deaths Estimated Number of Emergency-Room Treated Injuries

2011

327

*

107,500

2010

590

726

115,000

2009

684

765

131,900

2008

741

837

135,100

2007

822

890

150,900

2006

833

903

146,600

2005

799

924

136,700

2004

754

854

136,100

2003

653

762

125,500

2002

550

609

113,900

2001

520

598

110,100

2000

447

547

  92,200

1999²

397

534

  82,000

1998

252

289

  67,800

1997

240

290

  52,800

1996

249

268

  53,600

1995

200

273

  52,200

1994

198

243

  50,800

1993

183

210

  49,800

1992

220

242

  58,200

1991

230

254

  58,100

1990

235

252

  59,500

1989

230

257

  70,300

1988

250

285

  74,600

1987

264

282

  93,600

1986

300

348

106,000

1985

250

293

105,700

Source: National Electronic Injury Surveillance System and other CPSC data collection systems,
Directorate for Epidemiology, U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission.
¹ Deaths reported as of Dec. 31, 2011. Death data collection for 2008 and forward is incomplete and is denoted by italics.
² Values above the heavy line in the table above reflect a revised classification system from the one used prior to 1999. Specifically, the line marks the switch from data collection under the Ninth Revision of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-9) to collection under the Tenth Revision (ICD-10), a transition that occurred in January of 1999. The ICD-10 transition and related methodological issues are discussed more fully in Appendix A of CPSC’s 2010 Annual Report of All-Terrain Vehicle (ATV)-Related Deaths and Injuries
* Not yet available.

ATV-Related Deaths and Injuries for Children Under 16 1982-2011

(ATVs with 3, 4 or Unknown Number of Wheels)

Year Reported Deaths ¹ Percent of Total
Reported Deaths
for All Ages
Year Estimated Number of
Emergency-Room
Treated Injuries
Percent of Estimated
Injuries for All Ages

2011

57

17%

2011

29,000

27%

2010

82

14%

2010

28,300

25%

2009

94

14%

2009

32,400

25%

2008

107

14%

2008

37,700

28%

2007

135

16%

2007

40,000

27%

2006

142

17%

2006

39,300

27%

2005

162

20%

2005

40,400

30%

2004

182

24%

2004

44,700

33%

2003

153

23%

2003

38,600

31%

2002

133

24%

2002

37,100

33%

2001

133

26%

2001

34,300

31%

2000

123

28%

2000

32,000

35%

1999²

 90

23%

1999

27,700

34%

1998

 82

33%

1998

25,100

37%

1997

 79

33%

1997

20,600

39%

1996

 87

35%

1996

20,200

38%

1995

 64

32%

1995

19,300

37%

1994

 54

27%

1994

21,400

42%

1993

 59

32%

1993

17,900

36%

1992

 71

32%

1992

22,000

38%

1991

 68

30%

1991

22,500

39%

1990

 81

35%

1990

22,400

38%

1989

627

40%

1989

25,700

37%

1988

1988

28,500

38%

1987

1987

38,600

41%

1986

1986

47,600

45%

1985

1985

42,700

40%

1984

1984

*

*

1983

1983

1982

1982

Source: National Electronic Injury Surveillance System and other CPSC data collection systems,
Directorate for Epidemiology, U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission.
¹ Deaths reported as of Dec. 31, 2011. Death data collection for 2008 and forward is incomplete and is denoted by italics. The percentages shown in column 3 for the years where reporting is incomplete should be interpreted with caution because the rate at which deaths are reported may not be consistent across all age groups.
² Values above the heavy line in the table above reflect a revised classification system from the one used prior to 1999. Specifically, the line marks the switch from data collection under the Ninth Revision of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-9) to collection under the Tenth Revision (ICD-10), a transition that occurred in January of 1999. The ICD-10 transition and related methodological issues are discussed more fully in Appendix A of CPSC’s 2010 Annual Report of All-Terrain Vehicle (ATV)-Related Deaths and Injuries
* Adjusted yearly estimates for children under 16 years old were not computed prior to 1985.

Annual Estimates of ATV-Related Deaths and Risk of Death for Four-Wheel ATVs as of December 31, 2011

Year Reported Deaths ¹ Estimated Deaths Associated with
ATVs with 3, 4, or Unknown Wheels
Estimated Deaths Involving 4-Wheel ATVs Estimated 4-Wheel ATVs in Use (millions) ² Estimated Risk of Death per 10,000 4-Wheel ATVs in Use

2010

590

726

714

10.6

0.7

2009

684

765

747

10.5

0.7

2008

741

837

818

10.2

0.8

2007

822

890

860

9.5

0.9

2006

833

903

876

8.6

1.0

2005

799

924

883

7.8

1.1

2004

754

854

815

7.0

1.2

2003

653

762

726

6.3

1.2

2002

550

609

571

5.6

1.0

2001

520

598

553

4.9

1.1

2000

447

547

498

4.2

1.2

1999³

397

534

485

3.6

1.4

1998

252

289

247

3.1

0.8

1997

240

290

236

2.7

0.9

1996

249

268

209

2.4

0.9

1995

200

273

210

2.2

1.0

1994

198

243

168

2.0

0.8

1993

183

210

143

1.9

0.7

1992

220

242

159

1.9

0.8

1991

230

254

151

1.8

0.8

1990

235

252

152

1.8

0.9

1989

230

257

152

1.6

0.9

1988

250

285

151

1.4

1.1

1987

264

282

126

1.1

1.1

1986

300

348

 95

0.7

1.3

1985

250

293

 55

0.4

1.5

Source: U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, Directorate for Epidemiology, Division of Hazard Analysis.
Italics denote the period for which reporting is incomplete.
¹ Reporting is incomplete for 2008 – 2010.
² Rounded.
³ Values above the heavy line in the table above reflect a revised classification system from the one used prior to 1999. Specifically, the line marks the switch from data collection under the Ninth Revision of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-9) to collection under the Tenth Revision (ICD-10), a transition that occurred in January of 1999. The ICD-10 transition and related methodological issues are discussed more fully in Appendix A of CPSC’s 2010 Annual Report of All-Terrain Vehicle (ATV)-Related Deaths and Injuries
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Old Diary

Towing Tips

NotTheIdeaTowPackage

It’s important to match your Trailer to your towing package.

Ok — this post’s title is just a ruse just to get you to look at the picture!  Looks like fun but I’m not sure I’d want to bounce along down the road attached to a pachyderm!

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