Easter


For the years I have written this blog I have not crusaded as a proselytizing Christian but I have made no secret of the fact that I am a believer in Jesus Christ.  This time — Easter — is to men and women of faith a time of hope, and of re-invigoration.  The message of one risen from the dead — as hard as that may seem to some to believe — is a fundamental part of accepting Jesus of Nazareth for whom he claimed to be.  It is the “period” pronounced upon all the promises made in what is popularly called The Bible.

I accept that a lot of folks go to Christian churches and consider themselves believers whether or not they ever attempt to do the things Jesus taught.  It’s not my job to judge anyone.  I accept that there are also folks to don’t go to any church — Christian or otherwise — who are better examples of Jesus’ teachings than a great many Christians might be.  Once again, it’s not my job to judge.

But a part of Jesus’ message for those who are willing to hear it is that there is more to life than this time we know of on earth.  That Jesus should have risen from the dead, even if we can’t understand how or why is a monumental draws a monumental question mark on all that we think we know about this world and existence.  There is reason and there are rules to the way the world works. But there is also hope, and faith, and the power of the unknown at work in this world.  Reason isn’t based on hope; hope isn’t based on reason — they reside in their own worlds and the fact of one does not negate the reality of the other.

If we can forget about Easter Bunnies and egg hunts and all the popular marketing games designed to rid us of our money there remains a fundamental point to this “holiday.”  Humankind has reason to hope for something better.  And if we have hope, maybe we’ll do something positive to make that hope come true.  And if enough of us make things come true then what we hope for might just happen.  If not in the way we imagine, then — perhaps — in even better and grander and more satisfying ways.

This year there hasn’t been much focus on the Easter message.  This country is torn by shame and anger over it’s political circus.  World residents are saddened by the fire at Notre Dame Cathedral.  There have been plenty of negatives to occupy the mind of the masses.  But hope lives.  And we celebrate Easter each year in part as a reminder of the central place that hope has in our life.  In our collective lives.

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2 thoughts on “Easter

  1. One of my pet peeves is the “Christian” who thinks the term “deserving poor” means those people deserve to be poor thus do nothing to serve them. How much does it cost most of us to donate food, clothes, and school supplies?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Sad to say, Linda, but there are a lot of claims made by “christian” people that Jesus would never approve. Just because someone calls themself a thing does not make it true.

      And you’re right it doesn’t have to cost a great deal to help others, and there are an infinite number of ways that we can do that from money, to time, to teaching, to listening, to donations and on and on.

      >

      Like

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