Saying Good Bye


How quickly acquaintances can become friends!  We’re invited to a potluck for one of the seasonal rangers who’s leaving to take up his first permanent-hire job with the CORPS.  We haven’t known him long, and he’s not much older than our granddaughter — so he’s almost like family.  But we’ll miss him.  And we wish him luck.

It was nice to be invited to the potluck.  It’s a small office.  If the entire summer staff are working there are 6 people to take care of a 650 acre property.  So everyone has an important role to play.  At least important in the little world that is ours right here and right now.

We ended up taking Crockpot Italian Sausage and Peppers.  It’s funny that since we have been retired we have been using our crockpot much more than we ever used it when we were employees. What’s up with that? …Anyway I seem to have developed a thing about Italian Sausage and Peppers over the last few years; hardly ever ate it earlier in life but love it now!

All these goodbyes have me thinking about the act of leave-taking.  My family was about three brothers and three sisters who married and had smaller children than their parents.  Dad’s parents and siblings saw each other a few times a year — which is a deceptive statement as one of the brothers lived next door to “The Folks” for 30 years and then “The Folks” came to Milwaukee and lived in one of our apartments for another 10 years.  On my mom’s side the three sisters married and they too had smaller families than their parents.  Two sisters had only 1 child and one remained childless. And all three sisters and their mother lived within 20 miles of each other for most of their lives.  We had moved to Algoma for 4 years, and Clara had moved to Florida for 5 years but other than that the ‘girls’ were tightly tied to mom’s apron strings. Which did nothing to keep them from seeing each other.  They divided up the holidays and every single holiday we all met up at one house or another for a meal, laughter, conversation, a post-meal walk and the occasional argument.  We saw each other a lot and saying goodbye wasn’t a big deal because it wasn’t going to be very long before we saw each other again.

Peg’s family was a little different. Peg’s dad had a lot of siblings and a loose family.  Peg’s mom had two siblings and they lived in the same town but they weren’t close the same way.  Goodbyes took forever.  It was like there were separate ‘acts’ to saying goodbye.  You’d say goodbye in the living room.  Then you’d day goodbye on the porch.  Then your hosts might walk with you to the car and you’d say goodbye again.  And then, of course, there was walking to the end of the driveway to wave as they left.  It was quite a traumatic experience — and still you saw them again in a few weeks so it wasn’t like it was going to be a long absence.

Last winter our neighbors on the driver’s side of the coach were particularly social and they ‘left’ the park a couple times.  Every time they left they had a leaving party.  Lots of drinking and socializing.

Saying goodbye to campers in a public campground is a little more abbreviated.  With maximum stays of 14 days, folks don’t get to know each other as well, and they seem to be more like to to end up being more like “Have a safe trip home.”

So, tell me, what are YOUR goodbyes like?

thanks for stopping by, and why not stop again tomorrow for a chat?

 

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29 Comments

    1. Well, there is that!
      For me it’s also adding in the factor that we have no ‘regular’ oven. We do have the microwave/convection one — but those are built to reset/turn off after 90 minutes, which means that some of the things I’d want to back I would have to come back at the right time and reset — and hope that it didn’t overheat something inside. And there is the issue that the convection takes so long to heat up at the HIGH end of the temperature range. To bake a pizza at 450º is virtually impossible in this little convection — takes forever to get up to 450º and not sure it does even when it says it’s preheated. (based on actual bake time)
      If anything drives me off the road the question of not having an oven will be a significant factor I’m sure. I miss my real homemade breads — the bread machine is OK, but just OK. I miss what the real oven does for so many products.

      Liked by 1 person

  1. Then there was the time my Dad’s aunt hid our coats so we couldn’t leave. We ended up staying overnight.

    We use our crockpot more now because we have time in the morning to put things in it.

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    1. “We use our crockpot more now because we have time in the morning to put things in it.” — and therein probably lies the answer! We are the same.

      Love the hiding of the coats!

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  2. Oh my…now I’m really hungry… and I already ate dinner!

    Goodbyes with my aunt on the phone are like Peg’s family goodbyes. We say goodbye and then remember something else we wanted to tell each other. Now, Rick calls me to dinner so I really have to hang up, lol.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’m not sure what it is, but lately I have had this hunger for Italian sausage and peppers — but it’s not a thing I every ate very often in the past.

      Being late for a meal is always a good reason not to stay on the phone!

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      1. Funny you should have cravings for sausage and peppers…me too! I wonder if it’s a seasonal craving or a variety of food that is perfect for summertime meals.

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      2. I don’t know. I used to think that cravings were particularly related to shortages in our diet — but what it might be that I’m not eating enough of to cause a hunger for sausage and peppers is beyond me. Then again others have their regular cravings…. Peggy needs her pasta 1X per week. She just does.
        All I know is that I’m enjoying being just a little bit Italian for a while. Seeing as we may end up in Texas this winter I better get my fix now because it will be seafood and Mexican down there. Seems our desert intentions have run amok.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Hmmm…. things people eat daily… that could be a whole blog! Not just one article. 🙂

        It could also be an interesting way of getting to know people. “Tell me, what is it that you absolutely have to eat every day?” I bet THAT could be an interesting conversation a million times over!

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      4. Hmmm…for me that is fruit. I love fruit and for a while I had to stop eating it because I thought it was the reason behind my having trouble losing weight. Turns out it wasn’t the fruit. Since I have stopped eating GMO corn and lost weight as a result, I took up eating fruit again to see if that affected my weight gain and it doesn’t. Yipeee!!! I have started eating organic corn products and so far, weight is not coming back but I think it’s too early to say that organic corn works okay.

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      5. I’m with you on the fruit.

        Peg doesn’t seem to care but I’m a piece or two a day guy. She’ll get onto a bananas binge once in a while, but seeing as I’m the one with low potassium some of the time why SHE does the bananas eludes me. 🙂

        >

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      6. I wish I could eat ice cream every day. I seem to have a dairy intolerance and can only eat it occasionally now.

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      7. For several years I was eating it daily. I’d stop wherever I was and find a place, or even just an ice cream bar if nothing else was available. DQ’s were wonderful. Didn’t have to be much —even a small cone. But just a little.

        And after pizza…. Ice Cream is de rigeur.

        >

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    1. Yeah — I guess that the reason for the goodbye might change the response!

      In the case of the soon departed a lot depends on my relationship with them. I used to be called on to bury people and if I was officiating — even in the case of a very close friend/relative — I tended to hold it together and grieve on my own away from others. — but that is different than the case of a short separation, or even a permanent separation.

      >

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Funerals ( correction – celebrations of life ) reside in a realm of their own. Saying goodbye to the living is a breeze compared to sending off the dead. At least once a month work finds me presiding over post service food and beverage. Oh my goodness, it’s horrible! Remembrances of people I don’t even know – tears streaming down my face. Bagpipes – game over!

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      2. Funny, I never thought about food service in connection with funerals even though we have used caterers and restos after service for our own parents and friends… How odd that for me that was a blank. Hmmmm…. something to think about. Seriously…. It kind of bothers me that something so ‘important’ was a non-entity…..

        >

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Not really that odd – from my perspective -responsibility to facilitate a seamless transition from formality to informal mingling demands a perception of invisibility. I’m there to iron out logistical bumps and support the family. We strive to be transparent – if only I could control my empathetic tears. Yikes. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      4. Interesting point. Thanks.

        I share some of the empathy thing though… there are a lot of times that I hear the emotion in something… songs especially and get all emotionally carried away.

        Liked by 1 person

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